Saturday, October 18, 2014

#GamerGate is harassment. Its members just don't realize it.

I don't want to spend a lot of time recapping GamerGate. Wikipedia has a fairly good summary, with citations. Suffice it to say, supporters of GamerGate see the movement as a call for ethics in video game journalism. Detractors, which generally includes me, say it began as a misogynistic hate movement directed toward Anita Sarkeesian, a feminist game critic, and Zoe Quinn, a game developer, and has never really progressed past that.

One of the responses I see often to this claim is that calling GamerGate sexist is blaming the entire movement for the actions of a few trolls. After all, anyone can jump on Twitter, throw some horrific abuse at a female game developer and tack on the #GamerGate hashtag. There's no central leadership, no registration. And certainly, the vast majority of GamerGate supporters aren't sending death threats.

I won't dispute that. The issue is that harassment goes way beyond death threats. Condemning death threats is not condemning harassment; that's basic human decency. In fact, far from condemning harassment, many #GamerGaters -- based on Twitter/Reddit responses to me an others, I'd say at least a majority -- are participating in it.