Friday, September 18, 2015

Star Wars: Aftermath Discussion and Review


Aftermath is a controversial book. The reviews on Amazon make it clear: lots of five star reviews, and lots of one-star reviews. Let's be honest, though -- this is a Star Wars book. I love Star Wars (to the point where I think it's actually the defining American myth), but in the end this is still a licensed novel, and really not worth of the hemming and hawing that accompanied, say, .

I feel bad for Chuck Wendig, which is weird thing to say about an author who is at the height of his popularity and has no doubt brought in a nice chunk of change from this novel. He's waded into a fight that's not really about him, and he's born the brunt of the attacks in recent weeks. Detractors say it's because he's a bad writer, or because the book just doesn't feel like Star Wars, but that's not really the issue. The issue is that a subset of Star Wars are staunchly conservative.

Now, I don't mean politically conservative. Some of them are that as well, but the overall problem is that these fans simply can't accept change. In any form. And change is here, oh yes. The biggest and most infuriating, from the perspective of these "fans" (I don't like to put quotes around that word, but can we even call people who hate the property "fans?"), is the EU Apocalypse which relegated all the Star Wars stories told prior to the Disney-Lucasfilm merger to the dustbin of history. There's been plenty of dicussion of the necessity of this move (and yes, it was necessary), but none of that will convince the EU fanatics. To them, saying the EU is finished (or worse, not "real") is equivalent to retconning the original films. If you claim that Han and Leia don't actually have a daughter named Jaina, you might as well claim that Luke wasn't actually Vader's son.

All that's bad enough, but there are real-world changes to Star Wars as well. Wendig is a new author to the universe; if Disney had chosen to hire Timothy Zahn, the originator of the original Star Wars EU, some of the old school fans might have swallowed the change easier. Aftermath is also written in a very modern style -- very urban fantasy, which is something that hasn't often been seen in the tentpole Star Wars novels (though the degree to which this is new and mindblowing has been vastly overstated). It also contains not one, not two, but -- *gasp!* -- FIVE gay characters! If you think I'm exaggerating how big of an issue this is, I welcome you to browse some of those one-star reviews. CTRL-F 'gay' if you like, and see how many hits you get. The accusation is that the mere existence of LGBT characters (there is no sex, not even any kissing or same-sex hand-holding) is 'shoving it down our throats.'

Some people have accused me of conflating all of these complaints, but I think they generally stem from the same discomfort.

The organized effort to sink Aftermath has been operating under the assumption that if the book fails to sell, Disney will reverse course, bring back the old no-gay, Jaina-and-Jacen EU to canon status (or, more realistically, continue to release new stories in the Legends universe). This, of course, is not even an option. But assuming it was, the diehards have failed. Aftermath hit the NYT Bestseller list two weeks in a row. Force Friday was an amazing financial success. The change in the Star Wars universe cannot be halted anymore than the change in our universe (LGBT characters aren't going anywhere anytime soon).

And you know what? You're free to be mad about it. The appropriate response to those feelings might be, "You know what? I liked the EU, I'm not a fan of how they've changed it. I think I'll back my bags and move on to a different thing to get my nerd on about." Boycotting is always an acceptable course of action. The inappropriate, juvenile response is to throw a temper-tantrum and dedicate a non-trivial portion of your day to trying to sink the book and its author.

So is it any good? Yep, it is. The stream-of-consciousness does take some getting used to, but it only took me a chapter or so before I was immersed. Random-ass excerpts posted on Reddit do not do *any* written work justice, and this one suffers more than most from being digested out of context. Many of the new characters are some of the best I've seen in Star Wars in a long time -- I particularly loved the continuing development of Imperial Admiral Rae Sloane, as well as the introduction of the Imperial "loyalty officer" (read: torturer) named Sinjir. The vingettes interspered between the main narrative chapters give us a great glimpse into the post-ROTJ galaxy, and also provide neat little hooks for future stories.

Aftermath probably won't blow your mind, but it's easily the best Star Wars book to come out since the Disney purchase, and it's well worth the time of any Star Wars fan. If you refuse to try it, it might be time to accept that you're no longer a Star Wars fan. And that's totally fine.

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